High Times

Flashback Friday: Dutch Punk In The 1960s

In this May, 1988 High Times story, Jeff Jarema and Jim Wynand discuss early punk music from the Netherlands, and how the British Invasion hit Amsterdam long before it arrived in the States. Though the musical contributions of ’60s greats like the the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and the Byrds, to name just a few, is beyond question, there were other groups from that era who made little impact at the time, but whose influence has endured, growing steadily to this day. Anybody who can appreciate these seminal bands knows that it’s underdogs like the Sonics from Seattle and the […]

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Flashback Friday: Dance Plague

From the November, 1980 issue of High Times comes John A. Keel’s contribution to the “Last Words” column, all about the phenomenon of so-called “dancing mania.“ First, lift your left foot as high as it will go… and hold it there. Now raise your right foot until it is parallel to the left one. If you descend rapidly to an uncomfortable position on your rotund posterior, you have failed the test But if you remain suspended in midair you may have an even worse problem. You are levitating, an act that is against the law in 32 countries, and you […]

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High Times Greats: Malcolm X

In observance of the anniversary of Malcolm X’s death on February 21, 1965, we’re republishing the following item from the June, 1993 issue of High Times, edited by Steven Hager. On Sunday, February 21, 1965, Malcolm X, a leading spokesperson for the black power movement, was assassinated at the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem. Although at least five men were involved in the execution, only three were ever arrested and their subsequent trial was riddled with irregularities. Despite evidence of conspiracy and cover-up, the official investigation made little attempt to track the real motives behind the murder. Like many of the […]

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High Times Greats: Death of Gonzo King Hunter S. Thompson

For the June, 2005 issue of High Times, then-editor Steve Bloom penned a loving memorial in “The Message” section of the magazine, dedicated to the late journalist and author Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005). Thompson was (and remains) a counterculture icon for his singular, often drug-fueled perspective on American society. He served as an embedded reporter for the 1967 book Hell’s Angels: The Strange and Terrible Saga of the Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs; ran as sheriff in Colorado in 1970; and his 1971 book Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas was later adapted into a 1998 film by Terry Gilliam, featuring Johnny […]

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High Times Greats: Flying Founding Fathers

This Presidents’ Day, we’re bringing you Peter Gorman’s July, 1988 feature on hemp in colonial times. Hemp was one of this country’s most important crops during the colonial era. Washington was a fanatic seed collector and grower of cannabis; Jefferson, another cannabis farmer, invented a machine to reduce the labor involved in farming the plants; Franklin begged the British Parliament to allow the colonists to keep their cannabis crop rather than turn it over to England. When Harry J. Anslinger, then head of the fledgling Federal Bureau of Narcotics, finally ramrodded Congress into passing the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937, […]

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High Times Greats: John Trudell

For the August, 1992 issue of High Times, John Trudell (1946-2015) spoke with Steve Bloom. In honor of what would have been Trudell’s 75th birthday on February 15, we’re republishing it below. John Trudell was the chairman and chief spokesperson of the American Indian Movement (AIM) from 1973 to 1979. Born in Omaha in 1946, he grew up on the Santee Sioux reservation in Nebraska. Trudell was a major figure in the 1973 occupation of Wounded Knee. Two years later, two FBI agents were killed on the Pine Ridge reservation. A pair of recent films attempt to document this tragic […]

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Flashback Friday: Love Addicts

In celebration of Valentine’s Day, we’ve unearthed John Michell’s March, 1980 article that profiles casualties of love and madness. You’re welcome! Frustrated passion is just about the worst pain there is. It’s worse than gout, which is said to be the second worst pain after childbirth; worse than being eaten by a lion, which Livingstone, who experienced a bit of the process, said was neither particularly frightening nor painful at the time; much worse than being ruined, and even worse than the bereavement of friends and family. More people commit suicide as a result of sexual jealousy and love obsession […]

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High Times Greats: Rob Thomas

For the September, 2005 issue of High Times, Rob Thomas expressed a love for all things marijuana. On the occasion of Thomas’ birthday on February 14, we’re republishing Shirley Halperin’s interview below. The year is 2002, and the multi-platinum Matchbox Twenty are about to release their third album, More Than You Think You Are. As the record’s getting its final touches, I’m invited to listen to some of the tracks at New York’s Hit Factory studio. Coming in, I expect to hear hits—as in hit singles. The engineer blasts songs like “Disease” (co-written by Mick Jagger) and “Bright Lights,” both […]

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High Times Greats: Rip Torn

Back in the ’50s Elia Kazan called him “another Brando,” but within a decade this gifted actor was virtually blacklisted from the screen for daring to organize strikes by performers, speaking out against the Vietnam War and refusing to compromise with the Hollywood establishment. Then, following the culture hero’s artistic triumphs in roles ranging from Richard Nixon in the TV miniseries Blind Ambition to Howard Hughes in Sam Shepard’s play Seduced, Craig Ryes paid tribute to Rip Torn (1931-2019) for the July, 1980 issue of High Times, and he got the last laugh on them all. In honor of the […]

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Flashback Friday: Snakes

Snakes inspire some and scare others. For the October, 1980 issue of High Times, resident snake charmer John A. Keel slithered his way into our hearts. Belly buttons were banned on CBS-TV. It was a dark age and ABC had not yet discovered T&A. Over at NBC a dotty old lady sat in a closet, compiling an unending list of no-nos. You couldn’t discuss astrology, flying saucers or birth control on the tube. The words God and crazy were strictly verboten. (Superior being was considered the acceptable substitute for God, and crazy was taboo because some psychologist had the theory […]

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